Command Staff

Chief Dale Brophy

  • Police Chief
  • Investigations
  • Training
  • Special Events
  • Community Outreach
  • Main Campus Security

Lt. Rick Mclenon

  • Investigations
  • Training
  • Special Events
  • Community Outreach
  • Main Campus Security

Lt. Brian Wahlin

  • Patrol
  • Bike Squad
  • FTO

Lt. Lynn Rohland

  • Hospital Security Division

Misty Woods

  • Assistant to the Chief

Nerma Music

  • Budget Officer
The core values of the organization are: Integrity: There is no more important value for us as law enforcement and security professionals than demonstrating integrity in all we say and do. Respect for the Law: Consistent with aggressively protecting our integrity is a similar duty to demonstrate an uncompromising respect for the law. We are expected to live by and obey the same laws we are charged with enforcing. Respect for Individuals: In meeting our obligations under the law, demonstrating respect for individuals both outside and inside the organization is essential. We will treat the people we contact and our colleagues inside the department with courtesy, respect and dignity. Biased behaviors of any description damage our ability to serve the University community and to work effectively together as public safety employees. Service to the Community: We recognize that public safety departments are service organizations. In providing this service it is essential that we develop strong lasting partnerships with the University community to solve community related problems, to enhance public safety, reduce crime and diminish the fear of crime.
More than enforcement, the police department offers safety escorts, self-defense classes for women, bike registrations, fingerprinting services, background checks, as well as information for help with domestic violence, suicide support and details about general safety on campus. In January 1948 the police department began as a small security office with limited authority. The officers walked a beat, registered vehicles on campus and provided traffic control. Security vehicles at that time consisted of one three-wheeled motorcycle, a used Army Jeep and hand-me-downs from other departments on campus. Traffic accidents, arrests, serious problems and criminal investigations were handled by local police agencies. With the construction of the hospital, completion of more campus buildings and increased traffic it was apparent the department would need to be restructured to meet the needs of the university community. It was decided in July 1965 to formalize a fully operating police department, which now includes 32 sworn officers, 70 security officers and 11 dispatchers.